[鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com Balancing the heat from what you eat and drink Sat, 10 Mar 2012 03:00:01 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.3.1 FB Liangcha - Herbal Cooling Tea For Smart People. Liangcha means 'Cooling Tea' in Chinese. 'Liangcha' is part of a tea drinking culture that is used to balance the heat build up within our bodies due to the things we eat, drink as well as the climate. Ben SanamiMorrill no Ben SanamiMorrill info@herbalcoolingtea.com info@herbalcoolingtea.com (Ben SanamiMorrill) FBL Herbal Cooling Teas Balancing the heat from what you eat and drink herbal tea, herbal cooling tea, herbal warming tea, tea, liangcha, Chinese tea, Japanese tea [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas http://projecth2o.org/bzhuo/wp-images/rss_feeds.gif http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com Halifax, NS Twitter Weekly Updates for 2012-03-07 http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/twitter-weekly-updates-for-2012-03-07-2/ http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/twitter-weekly-updates-for-2012-03-07-2/#comments Wed, 07 Mar 2012 06:00:00 +0000 ben http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/twitter-weekly-updates-for-2012-03-07-2/ Twitter Weekly Updates for 2012-03-07 is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas

]]>
  • Study: Drinking Green Tea May Protect Against Lead Poisoning: A new study published last month in Neurotoxicolog… http://t.co/NKV0G1d8 #
  • The truth about caffeine: Effects on the human body: There are many myths surrounding caffeine and its effects a… http://t.co/2M6Ww7DZ #
  • Updated Facebook Fan pages with the new timeline feature for fan pages #
  • Tweeked up the homepage today. I'm trying to keep things simple #
  • Twitter Weekly Updates for 2012-03-07 is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas




    FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleUpon



    Powered by MaxBlogPress]]>
    http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/twitter-weekly-updates-for-2012-03-07-2/feed/ 0
    Adding Herbs and Fruit to Iced Tea: A Love Infusion http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/adding-herbs-and-fruit-to-iced-tea-a-love-infusion/ http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/adding-herbs-and-fruit-to-iced-tea-a-love-infusion/#comments Mon, 05 Mar 2012 01:59:00 +0000 Spirit Herbs http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/?guid=508c17107612eb3b76d6a6828e7434f0 Adding Herbs and Fruit to Iced Tea: A Love Infusion is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas

    ]]>
    Some 5000 years have passed since tea’s medicinal properties were discovered, and from a Western point of view the brew’s come full circle. Tea’s health benefits are mostly understood. Hell, we Southerners have known iced tea is the nectar of the Gods since, well, since God was a boy.
    But that doesn’t mean the healthful brew should be considered purely medicine. There’s a lesson to be learned in this: By taking a creative approaches to healthful living, you can boost flavor, nutrients and, in a simple way, quality of life. Who needs to feel deprived of what you used to have? You can have better than the normal stuff everyone else settles for.

    Let’s stick to the tea example. You can infuse iced tea with a variety of herbs and fruits just as easily as the recipes Kevin and I explore in Rabbit Food for Lions. So infusing isn’t just for food. Apply those techniques to tea (which is in infusion in itself) and sugar becomes a quaint memory.

    As the heat skyrockets this summer, a stimulating glass of tea can mean far more than a refreshing drink. To a point, of course. It’s still just a glass of tea . But it’s the simple things that make a difference between a life you enjoy and one that’s uninspiring — which coincidentally makes grabbing something damaging more attractive. Nevermind it’s also the difference between the before and after photos. The more enthused and interesting a healthy lifestyle is, the more healthful living stops being about “will power” or “discipline” and more about living an extraordinary life.  It just requires marrying culinary principles with health-minded ideas. The payoff is a extraordinary life. Sounds like a fair trade to us.

    A Spoonful of Sugar Helps the Medicine Go Down? 

    Eastern medicine has used teas and herbal infusions for at least 5000 years. Chinese Emperor Shen Nong is considered the Father of Agriculture, the Father of Traditional Eastern Medicine. Of course, today he’d be considered as much of a health nut as John Harvey Kellogg of Corn Flake’s Fame was.
    Nonetheless, he’s also credited for invented tea. The details vary with the storyteller, but in 2737 BC he blended herbs and hot water and created the herbal infusion. Long after his death, his studies of herbs and teas were credited in the seminal work of traditional Chinese medicine, The Divine Farmer’s Herb-Root Classic.

    Green tea usually leads the pack in terms of health benefits, mostly because of the presence of the antioxidant type catechin, which includes epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epicatechin-3 gallate (ECG), and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG).

    Among their many benefits being researched include fighting obesity and also helping prevent or treat cancer. The National Cancer Institute reports that 11 studies are currently underway to determine how catechins inhibit a number of cancers, including lung and prostate.

    The studies that have been completed already suggestion that green, black of white teas can have roles in cholesterol management, oral health, diabetes, neurological decline, kidney stones, heart attacks in studies published in credible medical journals such as the American Medical Association and the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

    Not to mention its benefit to obesity treatment and maintenance. Among the studies includes one published in 2005 by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition demonstrated tea-drinkers resulting in less weight, BMI, body fat mass and subcutaneous fat.

    A Handful of Herbs Helps the Medicine Go Down Even Better.

    Of course, these health benefits apply best when the tea isn’t laden with sugar and honey, as my Southern partners-in-crime are so fond of doing. We’re not fans of sugar substitutes in most cases, or copious use of sugar’s stunt doubles — the fake version doesn’t compare to the real thing.
    So like food, we look to herbs and fruits to add to iced tea in the hot summer. Before we start suggesting great flavors, here’s how to do it first:

    Fresh Fruit | Simply treat the tea like you would making Sangria — chop the fruit and add to the tea after it’s been iced but before it consuming. This is usually best overnight. Alternately, you can add the remains of juiced citrus fruits — not just lemon but also lime or any variety of orange — to the tea after it’s been iced. Just let the juiced rinds steep in the chilled brew.

    Frozen Fruit | Aggressively crushed frozen fruit and add to the tea when you add ice.

    Fruit Purees | If you have leftover fruit puree from one of Kevin’s recipes, treat it like old soda fountains handled syrup. Keep adding small amounts of puree to the tea after icing until both the tea and the fruit demand your pallet’s equal attention.

    Dried Herbs and Spices | Add dried herbs to the tea as it’s approaching a boil, so that its natural oils and flavors meld best with the tea’s flavor.

    Fresh Herbs | Like fresh fruit, add fresh herbs after the tea’s been iced. Be sure to thoroughly clean any fresh herbs picked from the garden.

    And Now the Fun Part — Killer Herb/Fruit Combinations for Your Iced Tea

    Kevin and I have some recommendation Rabbit Food-For-Lion worthy iced tea combination. Some ideas came from our kitchen, some we made up on the spot, and others were inspired by brews featured in coffee houses in Wilmington and New Orleans. Experiment with different teas (rotate between black, white and green teas) and different flavor additions.

    • Orange Rinds
    • Basil and Tarragon
    • Mint and Lemongrass
    • Blueberry and Clove
    • Ginger and Blackberry
    • Sage and Blackberry
    • Roasted Pineapple
    • Pomegranate or Pomegranate Molasses (if you’re dying for a little sugar)
    • Vanilla Bean and Pear

    http://ikeepitoff.com/2009/07/adding-herbs-and-fruit-to-iced-tea-a-love-infusion/

     

    Adding Herbs and Fruit to Iced Tea: A Love Infusion is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas




    FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleUpon



    Powered by MaxBlogPress]]>
    http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/adding-herbs-and-fruit-to-iced-tea-a-love-infusion/feed/ 0
    Adding Herbs and Fruit to Iced Tea: A Love Infusion http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/adding-herbs-and-fruit-to-iced-tea-a-love-infusion/ http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/adding-herbs-and-fruit-to-iced-tea-a-love-infusion/#comments Mon, 05 Mar 2012 01:59:00 +0000 Spirit Herbs http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/?guid=508c17107612eb3b76d6a6828e7434f0 Adding Herbs and Fruit to Iced Tea: A Love Infusion is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas

    ]]>
    Some 5000 years have passed since tea’s medicinal properties were discovered, and from a Western point of view the brew’s come full circle. Tea’s health benefits are mostly understood. Hell, we Southerners have known iced tea is the nectar of the Gods since, well, since God was a boy.
    But that doesn’t mean the healthful brew should be considered purely medicine. There’s a lesson to be learned in this: By taking a creative approaches to healthful living, you can boost flavor, nutrients and, in a simple way, quality of life. Who needs to feel deprived of what you used to have? You can have better than the normal stuff everyone else settles for.

    Let’s stick to the tea example. You can infuse iced tea with a variety of herbs and fruits just as easily as the recipes Kevin and I explore in Rabbit Food for Lions. So infusing isn’t just for food. Apply those techniques to tea (which is in infusion in itself) and sugar becomes a quaint memory.

    As the heat skyrockets this summer, a stimulating glass of tea can mean far more than a refreshing drink. To a point, of course. It’s still just a glass of tea . But it’s the simple things that make a difference between a life you enjoy and one that’s uninspiring — which coincidentally makes grabbing something damaging more attractive. Nevermind it’s also the difference between the before and after photos. The more enthused and interesting a healthy lifestyle is, the more healthful living stops being about “will power” or “discipline” and more about living an extraordinary life.  It just requires marrying culinary principles with health-minded ideas. The payoff is a extraordinary life. Sounds like a fair trade to us.

    A Spoonful of Sugar Helps the Medicine Go Down? 

    Eastern medicine has used teas and herbal infusions for at least 5000 years. Chinese Emperor Shen Nong is considered the Father of Agriculture, the Father of Traditional Eastern Medicine. Of course, today he’d be considered as much of a health nut as John Harvey Kellogg of Corn Flake’s Fame was.
    Nonetheless, he’s also credited for invented tea. The details vary with the storyteller, but in 2737 BC he blended herbs and hot water and created the herbal infusion. Long after his death, his studies of herbs and teas were credited in the seminal work of traditional Chinese medicine, The Divine Farmer’s Herb-Root Classic.

    Green tea usually leads the pack in terms of health benefits, mostly because of the presence of the antioxidant type catechin, which includes epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epicatechin-3 gallate (ECG), and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG).

    Among their many benefits being researched include fighting obesity and also helping prevent or treat cancer. The National Cancer Institute reports that 11 studies are currently underway to determine how catechins inhibit a number of cancers, including lung and prostate.

    The studies that have been completed already suggestion that green, black of white teas can have roles in cholesterol management, oral health, diabetes, neurological decline, kidney stones, heart attacks in studies published in credible medical journals such as the American Medical Association and the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

    Not to mention its benefit to obesity treatment and maintenance. Among the studies includes one published in 2005 by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition demonstrated tea-drinkers resulting in less weight, BMI, body fat mass and subcutaneous fat.

    A Handful of Herbs Helps the Medicine Go Down Even Better.

    Of course, these health benefits apply best when the tea isn’t laden with sugar and honey, as my Southern partners-in-crime are so fond of doing. We’re not fans of sugar substitutes in most cases, or copious use of sugar’s stunt doubles — the fake version doesn’t compare to the real thing.
    So like food, we look to herbs and fruits to add to iced tea in the hot summer. Before we start suggesting great flavors, here’s how to do it first:

    Fresh Fruit | Simply treat the tea like you would making Sangria — chop the fruit and add to the tea after it’s been iced but before it consuming. This is usually best overnight. Alternately, you can add the remains of juiced citrus fruits — not just lemon but also lime or any variety of orange — to the tea after it’s been iced. Just let the juiced rinds steep in the chilled brew.

    Frozen Fruit | Aggressively crushed frozen fruit and add to the tea when you add ice.

    Fruit Purees | If you have leftover fruit puree from one of Kevin’s recipes, treat it like old soda fountains handled syrup. Keep adding small amounts of puree to the tea after icing until both the tea and the fruit demand your pallet’s equal attention.

    Dried Herbs and Spices | Add dried herbs to the tea as it’s approaching a boil, so that its natural oils and flavors meld best with the tea’s flavor.

    Fresh Herbs | Like fresh fruit, add fresh herbs after the tea’s been iced. Be sure to thoroughly clean any fresh herbs picked from the garden.

    And Now the Fun Part — Killer Herb/Fruit Combinations for Your Iced Tea

    Kevin and I have some recommendation Rabbit Food-For-Lion worthy iced tea combination. Some ideas came from our kitchen, some we made up on the spot, and others were inspired by brews featured in coffee houses in Wilmington and New Orleans. Experiment with different teas (rotate between black, white and green teas) and different flavor additions.

    • Orange Rinds
    • Basil and Tarragon
    • Mint and Lemongrass
    • Blueberry and Clove
    • Ginger and Blackberry
    • Sage and Blackberry
    • Roasted Pineapple
    • Pomegranate or Pomegranate Molasses (if you’re dying for a little sugar)
    • Vanilla Bean and Pear

    http://ikeepitoff.com/2009/07/adding-herbs-and-fruit-to-iced-tea-a-love-infusion/

     

    Adding Herbs and Fruit to Iced Tea: A Love Infusion is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas




    FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleUpon



    Powered by MaxBlogPress]]>
    http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/adding-herbs-and-fruit-to-iced-tea-a-love-infusion/feed/ 0
    The Benefits of Anise Tea http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/the-benefits-of-anise-tea/ http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/the-benefits-of-anise-tea/#comments Wed, 29 Feb 2012 15:00:18 +0000 ben http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/?p=3153 The Benefits of Anise Tea is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas

    ]]>
    Anise Seed (Pimpinella anisum)

    Today I want to introduce one of my favorite herbs for tea. That was sort of a lie as I love all plants each one has its own characteristics. Anise is a member of the family of plants that includes carrots, caraway, cumin, dill, fennel, and cilantro all of which make great tasting teas. However, anise is the plant that has the strongest licorice flavor, which by the way is where the flavor for licorice candy comes from – the essential oil of anise. Strangely enough licorice candy is not usually made from licorice root at all!

    Parts of the Anise Used
    The whole dried fruit or seed pod.

    Culinary Uses of Anise
    First of all the full flavor of anise is better preserved when the seed pods are stored whole and then ground just before use. Anise is used in French carrot dishes, East Indian curries, Hispanic stews, and Scandinavian breads. It balances the flavors of bay leaf and cinnamon. Anise is also used to flavor many liqueurs.

    Benefits of Anise
    A teaspoon of freshly ground anise seed brewed into a tea can help relieve congestion from allergies, colds, or flu, and settle upset stomach due to gas. Many herbalists say that the herb is also antiseptic, antispasmodic, and soporific and that a few seeds taken with water will often cure hiccups. But the best advice concerning anise is that it is a great spice to consume for those who have dyspeptic complaints after eating certain dishes. The process of heating anise in baked goods releases compounds that act as very mild stimulants. The anethole released in grinding and baking slows the decay of baked goods that otherwise might result from fungi or molds. Anise is also used to flavor many herbal medicines.

    Precautions of Anise
    Allergies are possible, but rare. The anethole in the essential oil stimulates the release of estrogen in laboratory tests, but is not known to be of significant benefit or detriment to hormonal balance in humans. Not recommended while pregnant or nursing.

    Did you find this interesting? Please subscribe to the Herbal Cooling Tea For Smart People Cool Tea Tips and get my free tea guide as a gift just for joining. You can even unsubscribe after getting your free gift. Although we hope you can stay! ;) Join Here.

    The Benefits of Anise Tea is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas




    FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleUpon



    Powered by MaxBlogPress]]>
    http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/the-benefits-of-anise-tea/feed/ 0
    Twitter Weekly Updates for 2012-02-29 http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/twitter-weekly-updates-for-2012-02-29/ http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/twitter-weekly-updates-for-2012-02-29/#comments Wed, 29 Feb 2012 06:00:00 +0000 ben http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/twitter-weekly-updates-for-2012-02-29/ Twitter Weekly Updates for 2012-02-29 is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas

    ]]>
  • Yeah done the big translation project on to the next project! #
  • Thanks to lots of #liangcha #herbal cooling tea my throat's feeling better. #herbal tea #
  • Having trouble concentrating today at work. Not a good day #
  • at my new work location today. I like it, nice music, nice people, quieter! #
  • Found myself a new place to work that's a little closer but will cost a little more. Good rainy day location anyway #
  • Working for National Instruments today. http://t.co/OmKXDH6z diversify life, diversify jobs, diversify your diet! #
  • Twitter Weekly Updates for 2012-02-29 is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas




    FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleUpon



    Powered by MaxBlogPress]]>
    http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/twitter-weekly-updates-for-2012-02-29/feed/ 0
    Dandelion Tea Recipe http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/dandelion-tea-recipe/ http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/dandelion-tea-recipe/#comments Sat, 25 Feb 2012 06:27:00 +0000 Spirit Herbs http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/?guid=13697c840beae9fcb96cce7a73102b0c Dandelion Tea Recipe is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas

    ]]>
    When life gives you lemons make lemonade. If you lawn gives you dandelions, make dandelion tea! [common dandelion Taraxacum officinale]

    PREPARATION
    Once you pick the dandelion greens, wash them thoroughly to remove dirt particles.
    When clean, store them in a plastic bag which has holes punched for circulation, keeping them cold and humid. Use them as soon as possible, since greens are quite perishable.
    Select young, tender leaves for the tastiest dandelion tea.

    Individual portion
    Pour:
    1 cup boiling water
    Over:
    1 teaspoon dried dandelion leaves

    For a pot of tea
    Pour:
    1 cup boiling water for each person
    Over:
    1 teaspoon dried dandelion leaves for each person
    Throw in:
    1 teaspoon dried dandelion leaves “for the pot”
    Cover and let steep 3 minutes. Stir and let steep another minute.

    Serve with your choice of:
    (lemon)
    (orange)
    (mint)
    (honey)
    http://www.dandeliontea.org/dandelion-tea/dandelion-tea-recipe

    Dandelion Tea Recipe is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas




    FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleUpon



    Powered by MaxBlogPress]]>
    http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/dandelion-tea-recipe/feed/ 0
    Twitter Weekly Updates for 2012-02-22 http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/twitter-weekly-updates-for-2012-02-22/ http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/twitter-weekly-updates-for-2012-02-22/#comments Wed, 22 Feb 2012 06:00:00 +0000 ben http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/twitter-weekly-updates-for-2012-02-22/ Twitter Weekly Updates for 2012-02-22 is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas

    ]]>
  • Trying to do keyword research #
  • Tomorrow is fat Tuesday? What do they do? It's sort of sad that it's celebrated … #
  • @DAVIDsTEA @nwteafestival where is it? #
  • Twitter Weekly Updates for 2012-02-22 is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas




    FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleUpon



    Powered by MaxBlogPress]]>
    http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/twitter-weekly-updates-for-2012-02-22/feed/ 0
    6 Websites You Need to Read About Herbal Warming Tea http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/6-websites-about-herbal-warming-tea/ http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/6-websites-about-herbal-warming-tea/#comments Tue, 21 Feb 2012 15:00:01 +0000 ben http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/?p=3147 6 Websites You Need to Read About Herbal Warming Tea is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas

    ]]>
    Here are 6 links to websites I found interesting from the keyword Herbal Warming Tea. I strive to only offer quality content here so my link suggestions are not just promotions of other people’s products. Enjoy!

     

    Did you find this interesting? Please subscribe to the Herbal Cooling Tea For Smart People Cool Tea Tips and get my free tea guide as a gift just for joining. You can even unsubscribe after getting your free gift. Although we hope you can stay! ;) Join Here.

    Did you want a little more? Consider joining Herbs For Smart People the one and only PAID eCourse on herbal teas with out the hype, sleaze and all the diet/weight loss garbage.

    6 Websites You Need to Read About Herbal Warming Tea is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas




    FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleUpon



    Powered by MaxBlogPress]]>
    http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/6-websites-about-herbal-warming-tea/feed/ 0
    Sassafras Spring Tonic http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/sassafras-spring-tonic/ http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/sassafras-spring-tonic/#comments Tue, 21 Feb 2012 02:21:00 +0000 Spirit Herbs http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/?guid=a074e22c5c220f7300f792181d9d975c Sassafras Spring Tonic is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas

    ]]>
    This is a good tonic to use in the spring as it
    thins out the blood as well as adds needed
    minerals. Sassafras has been used for centuries
    as a spring tonic. Try it, it’s delicious.

    To make the tea, add several teaspoons of
    sassafras root or bark to about 2 cups of
    boiling water. Allow to steep 15 minutes. Strain
    and sweeten. Drink several cups per day for 1
    week. A commercial liquid of sassafras is
    available with certain substances removed. Just
    follow instructions on the bottle.
    http://www.herbalremedieslk.com

    Sassafras Spring Tonic is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas




    FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleUpon



    Powered by MaxBlogPress]]>
    http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/sassafras-spring-tonic/feed/ 0
    Healing (and yummy) Licorice Root Tea http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/healing-and-yummy-licorice-root-tea/ http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/healing-and-yummy-licorice-root-tea/#comments Fri, 17 Feb 2012 14:03:00 +0000 Spirit Herbs http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/?guid=b5d2c2a7ea73875e4ab03ecdccd65729 Healing (and yummy) Licorice Root Tea is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas

    ]]>
    Ingredients
    • 1 cup chopped dry licorice root
    • 1/2 cup cinnamon chips
    • 1/2 cup dried orange peel
    • 2 tablespoons whole cloves
    • 1/2 cup chamomile flowers

    Directions

    1. Mix everything well in a bowl and then store in a glass jar, away from light and heat.
    2. To prepare tea: Combine 3 heaping tablespoons of tea mix and 2.5 cups of cold water in a saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 10 minutes. Pour into a large teacup through a strainer and pass it on to the invalid with an empathy-filled smile. Then drink some yourself because it’s delicious (and so he can keep this sick bug to himself this time).

    http://www.nourishingdays.com

    Healing (and yummy) Licorice Root Tea is a post from: [鳳波凉茶] FB Liangcha - The Herbal Cooling Teas




    FacebookTwitterDiggStumbleUpon



    Powered by MaxBlogPress]]>
    http://www.herbalcoolingtea.com/healing-and-yummy-licorice-root-tea/feed/ 0